Drinking French

While dreaming  during these troubled times of getting back to France, it’s great to have a new book that evokes some of the things we love about the country. With “Drinking French” author David Lebovitz serves up more than 160 recipes for trendy cocktails, quintessential apéritifs, café favorites, typical Parisian snacks and more. Continue reading “Drinking French”

Half An Hour From Paris

Many guides claim to be for and by insiders, but this one truly is. Annabel Simms—living in Paris since 1991—delights in exploring the Paris countryside by train and sharing  ideas with her friends for discovering little-known travel gems. Her previous book “An Hour from Paris” is a popular go-to classic enjoyed by a generation of expats and seasoned Paris visitors. Continue reading “Half An Hour From Paris”

No Ordinary Season

James Jacobs’ debut novel “No Ordinary Season” revisits life in small town America. A first impression could be this is just another coming of age book. It is much more than that. Appearing a century after Sinclair Lewis’ iconic “Main Street,” Jacobs’ book, situated in the fictional town of River Bend, Indiana, portrays a town with some of the provincial attitudes and prejudices of Lewis’ day. Continue reading “No Ordinary Season”

Canal Saint-Martin

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Canal St Martin © Atherton

With its swinging footbridges and tree-lined quais teeming with people on long hot summer afternoons, the Canal Saint-Martin is yet another example of how appealing Paris is when it lives up to its clichés. Rooted in the city’s industrial past, today the canal offers plenty of opportunities for biking, sightseeing, and enjoying Parisian life at its most relaxed.

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The Latin Quarter Revisited

Discovering the 5 & 6th district

Romantic myths of Left Bank intelligentsia which date back seven centuries are brutally shattered on today’s busy bd St-Michel, the main artery of the Latin Quarter, where the 5th and 6th arrondissements meet.

The venerable Sorbonne, the quarter’s historic seat of intellectual life, is still there, but these days the forlorn chime of its chapel bell, which has punctuated the studies of generations of scholars, is drowned out by the din of passing traffic. Indeed most people who stream past the place de la Sorbonne seldom notice its beautiful 17th century chapel with its graceful dome. Continue reading “The Latin Quarter Revisited”