Tintoretto… a Star is Born

The Musée du Luxembourg marks the 500th anniversary of the birth of Venetian painter Jacopo Robusti —better known as Titntoretto—with an exhibition (Tintoret, Naissance d’un Génie) focusing on the first fifteen years of his career. The artist was born into a family of craftsmen. His father was a dyer (or tintore), hence the son got the nickname of Tintoretto, little dyer or dyer’s boy (to July 1st, 2018) Continue reading “Tintoretto… a Star is Born”

Painting Distant Lands

The Musée du Quai Branly-Jacques Chirac museum specializes in indigenous art and cultures of Africa, Asia, Oceania and the Americas. It opened in 2006 and is the newest of Paris’ major museums. A temporary exhibition at the museum “Peintures des Lointains” —looks at painters’ fascination with exotic people and places. It is the first time the museum has featured paintings from its vast collection of 450.000 objects . The painting exhibition includes mostly 19th century work from Ange Tissier’s “Odalisque” to daily life in Cairo by Emile Bernard to George Caitlin depictions of native Americans in the old west to Gauguin’s Tahiti. Continue reading “Painting Distant Lands”

Delights and Disasters of Making My Paris Home

“After a decade of living in Paris, it was time to make my dream come true: To own my own home in Paris, complete with my dream kitchen…” says author David Lebovitz discussing his new book “L’appart: The Delights and Disasters of Making My Paris Home.” Little did he know before embarking on this adventure that he would soon come face to face with France’s famed mind boggling red tape and quirky cultural idiosyncrasies that are challenging to even the most ardent anglo francophile. Continue reading “Delights and Disasters of Making My Paris Home”

Meet Raoul Hausmann the Dadasophe

Raoul Hausmann as danser 1929 August Sander ADAGP, Paris, 2017

“Vision in Action” —an exhibition at Paris’ Jeu de Paume— is an opportunity to discover the photographic work of Raoul Hausmann (1886-1971), one of the key figures in the Berlin Dada group, whose experimental photographic collages, poster poems, sound poetry and provocative art critiques had a profound influence on the European Avant-Garde in the aftermath of World War I (until May 20, 2018). Continue reading “Meet Raoul Hausmann the Dadasophe”

New Yves Saint Laurent Museum in Paris

The YSL brand has been long considered synonymous with French classic design. Now a there is a museum dedicated to the couturier’s work at the premises of his former haute couture house located at 5, avenue Marceau in Paris’ 16th arrondissement. Housed in the Second Empire mansion where the designer’s team worked for three decades, the museum covers all the major themes in Saint Laurent’s work, including: the most emblematic designs embodying the designer’s quintessential style, such as the tuxedo, the safari jacket, the jumpsuit and the trench coat; his various tributes to art such as the famous Mondrian dress and the collections inspired by his imagined journeys to such faraway places as China and India. Continue reading “New Yves Saint Laurent Museum in Paris”

RiverBlue

The documentary film River Blue asks the question “Can fashion save the planet?” The film follows river conservationist Mark Angelo as he chronicles some of world’s most polluted rivers. Along the way we discover the dark secret of the fashion industry while seeing some of the toxic side effects of textile production and jean manufacturing. Traveling from tanneries along rivers in India, to some of the largest jean manufacturing factories in China Angelo guides us on a journey through the environmental effects of toxic fashions.  Continue reading “RiverBlue”

John Baxter’s Saint-Germain-des-Pres

The Saint-Germain-des-Pres neighborhood is world famous for its connection with artists, writers and intellectuals… and now shopping. For many years this part of Paris has been a stronghold of the “sans culottes,” a refuge to artists and a place for bohemians. Napoleon, Hemingway, and Sartre have all called it home. Descartes is buried there. The writer Oscar Wilde spent his last days in the quarter, at the small, run-down hotel called the Hotel d’Alsace at 13 rue des Beaux‑Arts. The legendary Ecole des Beaux-Arts—attended by such artists as Pierre Bonnard, Edgar Degas and Georges Seurat—is here. And the Place Saint-Germain-des-Pres is where students battled the police in May 1968. Continue reading “John Baxter’s Saint-Germain-des-Pres”

Constance Guisset’s Magical Designs

Vertigo Lamps by Constance Guisset

The Musée des Arts Décoratifs exhibits recent work by designer and scenographer Constance Guisset (to March 11, 2018). The exhibition titled “Actio!” Is a retrospective of this young designer’s work featuring her creations over the past ten years. In addition to her design work she has made stage sets for choreographers Angelin Preljocaj and Wang Ramirez. She has also designed exhibition scenographies for Paris’ Musée du Quai Branly and the Palais des Beaux-Arts in Lille. Continue reading “Constance Guisset’s Magical Designs”

The Latin Quarter

Discovering the 5 & 6th district

Romantic myths of Left Bank intelligentsia which date back seven centuries are brutally shattered on today’s busy bd St-Michel, the main artery of the Latin Quarter, where the 5th and 6th arrondissements meet.

The venerable Sorbonne, the quarter’s historic seat of intellectual life, is still there, but these days the forlorn chime of its chapel bell, which has punctuated the studies of generations of scholars, is drowned out by the din of passing traffic. Indeed most people who stream past the place de la Sorbonne seldom notice its beautiful 17th century chapel with its graceful dome. Continue reading “The Latin Quarter”