Robert Adams. Our Lives…

One day, in the 1970s, the photographer Robert Adams noticed a column of smoke rising above the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant near Denver, Colorado and decided to document the potential destruction of a nuclear disaster. The resulting series “Our Lives and Our Children”  is exhibited this summer at the Fondation Henri Cartier-Bresson (to July 29, 2018). Continue reading “Robert Adams. Our Lives…”

Gilles Caron, Paris 1968

Gilles Caron, protest rue Saint-Jacques

The iconic photo of Daniel Cohn-Bendit with a mocking smile facing a policeman taken by the French photographer Gilles Caron (1939-1970) is one of the most famous images of Paris 68. For the 50th anniversary of those events, Paris’ City Hall and the Gilles Caron Foundation present the first major exhibition in Paris dedicated to this remarkable photographer. Continue reading “Gilles Caron, Paris 1968”

Willy Ronis Revisited

Black and white photography fans remember Willy Ronis (1910-2009) for his lyric post war photographs depicting working class Parisians of the Belleville and Ménilmontant neighborhoods. His photo book “Belleville Ménilmontant” is a beloved classic. Now, nearly a decade after his death, Ronis’ photographs are being exhibited back in Paris’ 20th arrondissement where many of the pictures were originally taken (at the Pavillon Carré de Baudouin until Sept 29, 2018). Continue reading “Willy Ronis Revisited”

Henrik Saxgren “Ultima Thule”

Hunter at Herbert Island in the Thuleregion in Northwest-Greenland.

Paris’ Denmark House is showing Henrik Saxgren’s stunning documentary photographs of Arctic Greenland (to May 17, 2018). Saxgren’s photos depict the life of sea hunters in the northernmost Greenlandic settlements. Documenting life in the harsh arctic wilderness he accompanied them on hunts on sea ice and travelled hundreds of miles by dog sled. The result is his latest book “Ultima Thule” and the exhibition at the Danish cultural center. Continue reading “Henrik Saxgren “Ultima Thule””

Dłubak, heir of the avant-garde

Desymbolisations, 1978
© Armelle Dłubak / Archeology of Photography Foundation, Warsaw

The Henri Cartier-Bresson Foundation revisits the work of photographer, painter and art intellectual Zbigniew Dłubak (1921-2005), who was a leading figure of the post-war Polish photographic scene (until April 29). “Zbigniew Dłubak, heir of the avant-garde” is not only an opportunity to discover an interesting Eastern European photographer, but also a snapshot of the Polish art scene during the Soviet era. Dłubak’s work blurs the lines between painting and photography, which may explain why he isn’t better known outside of Poland. The exhibition provides an overview of his artistic career and research beginning with his fifties modernist abstract experiments and includes his later more conceptual projects during the sixties and seventies such as “Iconosphere” “Desymbolisations” and “Asymmetry.”

“Zbigniew Dłubak, heir of the avant-garde”, to April 29, 2018, The Henri Cartier-Bresson Foundation

David Goldblatt’s Photographs

Goldblatt explains photos in video

The Centre Pompidou is showing photographs by David Goldblatt, who has chronicled South Africa and its people from the 1950s until today. The exhibition (until May 13, 2018) begins with his early 1960’s photos of “Afrikaner” famers and the mining world. His images provide insights into the troubled history of South Africa while inviting us to look at buildings and landscapes as indicators of the values of a society.  Continue reading “David Goldblatt’s Photographs”

Meet Raoul Hausmann the Dadasophe

Raoul Hausmann as danser 1929 August Sander ADAGP, Paris, 2017

“Vision in Action” —an exhibition at Paris’ Jeu de Paume— is an opportunity to discover the photographic work of Raoul Hausmann (1886-1971), one of the key figures in the Berlin Dada group, whose experimental photographic collages, poster poems, sound poetry and provocative art critiques had a profound influence on the European Avant-Garde in the aftermath of World War I (until May 20, 2018). Continue reading “Meet Raoul Hausmann the Dadasophe”

Jaromir Funke Revisited in Paris

Jaromir Funke

Paris’ Czech Cultural Center exhibits the work of photographer Jaromir Funke (1896-1945) who was a leading figure in Czech photography during the 1920’s and 1930’s. Funke’s work is a melange of the major trends in modernist European photography, blending constructivism and functionalism with surrealism, photograms and social commentary. He cofounded in 1924 the Czech Photographic Society with Josef Sudek and Adolf Schneeberger. Two years later he produced a series of Surrealist images of store windows titled “Glass and Reflection,” inspired by Eugène Atget. Continue reading “Jaromir Funke Revisited in Paris”

Ali Kazma’s “Souterrain”

Ali Kazma, “Subterranean” diptyque video

The Jeu de Paume in Paris is showing Turkish lens-based artist Ali Kazma’s recent non-narrative documentary videos (until January 21). Kazma, who studied in the States at the New School, represented Turkey in the 55th International Art Exhibition, la Biennale di Venezia. His video installations —usually five to fifteen minutes—are a melange of various situations and social types… a kind of update on August Sanders. In a recent interview with ARTE he described the documentary nature of his work as an effort to create a “poetic archive of the human condition.” Kazma’s videos are an excellent compliment to the other Jeu de Paume exhibition currently on devoted to legendary “New Objectivity” photographer Albert Renger-Patzsch. Continue reading “Ali Kazma’s “Souterrain””

Albert Renger-Patzsch’s “Things”

Stapelia variegata, Asclepiadaceae 1923 Albert Renger-Patzsch

A major exhibition of around 190 photographs revisits the work of the German photographer Albert Renger-Patzsch (1897-1966), whose photographs are associated with the “New Objectivity” genre ( to January 21, 2018).  His typologies and industrial landscapes have influenced the documentary style of several generations of photographers including Bernd and Hilla Becher as well as Andreas Gursky. Continue reading “Albert Renger-Patzsch’s “Things””

Magnum’s Analog Recovery at Le Bal

Leonard Freed. Harlem fashion show, New York, 1963 © Leonard Freed/Magnum Photos

The legendary Magnum photo agency, founded in 1947 by Robert Capa, David “Chim” Seymour, Henri Cartier-Bresson and George Rodger, is an international photo cooperative owned by its members. This year marks the 70th anniversary for the famed photography agency and the completion of its Paris archive. To celebrate Le Bal presents “Magnum Analog Recovery” an exhibition of work from Magnum’s Paris archives that spans from the agency’s creation in 1947 to 1977. This collection—stored in Paris as paper prints— brings together “press”  photos distributed to newspapers and magazines. Continue reading “Magnum’s Analog Recovery at Le Bal”